Maple Firewood

Maple firewood is a great firewood choice. Many people choose to burn maple because it is readily available and it provides good heat.

Although there are many different species of maple, the sugar maple (sometimes referred to as the hard maple) may be one of the best known. 

Known primarily for its sugar production, the sugar maple grows throughout the northeastern United States and southeastern Canada.

The sugar maple has the highest sap sugar content of any of the native maple species and is commonly used to produce maple syrup.

The trees are taped in the early spring and the sap is processed by cooking it to remove the excess moisture leaving behind maple syrup.

The sugar maple is a large tree. It can live for 200 years and stand 100 feet tall. Large, mature trees are often cut and used to produce lumber.

Silver Maple

The silver maple (sometimes referred to as soft maple) is the fastest growing maple species. The tree is found throughout the eastern United States and is commonly used as an ornamental tree due to its fast growth rate. The silver maple grows in a variety of soil conditions and has tolerance to a broad range of climates.

Silver maples can live up to 150 years and grow as tall as 100 feet. The wood tends to be very brittle and can often break during high winds or sever storms.

Although it is possible, the silver maple produces a lesser quality of sugar sap resulting in poor maple syrup.

Other Types

Other common types of maple trees found in North America are:

* Red Maple

* Boxelder

* Bigleaf Maple

* Black Maple

Maple Firewood Usage

Sugar maple will produce 24.0 million BTU's per cord.

Red maple will produce 18.6 million BUT's per cord.

Silver maple will produce 17.0 million BTU's per cord.

Overall maple is one of my favorite firewood choices. The trees are very common on my property and the majority of the wood I burn every year is maple. They are beautiful in the fall as their leaves turn fiery red or blaze orange and its heating capabilities have never let me down in the winter.

The wood is difficult to split but produces a hot fire. The wood is a great choice for anyone looking to use it in a fireplace or wood furnace.


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