Black Locust Firewood Recommendation

by Brian Blackak
(Agawam, MA )

I have to go with black locust. The bark is thick and can be messy, but who cares, we wouldn't be heating with wood if we were worried about the mess. It burns wicked hot and long, it's as hard as steel.

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Apr 11, 2016
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Locust Firewood
by: Anonymous

I moved to rural Virginia in 1989 and decided to heat with a wood stove.

I read an article at the local library that rated firewood by the number of BTUs it generated. On that list locust was number one, ahead of oak, hickory, maple, etc.

Interacting with locals I learned they also ranked locust as number one, saying it was quick to dry out, quick to start burning and the best for heat. All of which my experience confirms.

The only problem I have had with locust: there's not enough available.

Oct 14, 2015
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I Love Black Locust
by: Jim F.

Black locust generally has a shallow root system. Therefore we get a lot of blow downs. That makes the wood gathering MUCH easier. I like how hot it burns too.

Our other tree is Norway Maple which we have plenty of since it's a fast grower. I don't find much on any web site about the good/bad of Norway maple. Anyone have something to offer?

Sep 02, 2013
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Black Locust Firewood
by: John T

I agree Black Locust is excellent firewood if it is available. But it is difficult to work with and often very branchy. It is extremely dense and can be hard to split by hand. It burns hot and leaves a good bed of hot coals if dried properly.

While I do not pass up an opportunity to add black locust to my firewood pile, my personal preference is white and red oak or hard maple, all of which are readily available in our area of Michigan.

I like to add some dried Jack Pine to the pile to start or enhance a simmering fire in our wood furnace add on. It starts easily and burns hot. It also makes a good spring and fall firewood where you may want a hot fire for a short period on those chilly mornings. With all that said, if it burns I can find a time of the year to add it to my firewood pile. There are few species I pass up.

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